• Cold Lake First Nations Community Website

    Cold Lake First Nations Community Website

    "A livelihood for a livelihood"

    Cold Lake First Nations is pleased to welcome the world to our community website. We hope to continue to honor our Elders, both past and present, by proudly sharing our stories, history and current events with you. We dedicate this website to all the Elders and to the children of the Cold Lake First Nations. Enjoy your visit!
    Masi Chok. (Thank you).

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Łuéchogh Túé Announcements

  • Consultation Department OPEN HOUSE +

    March 29th
    Ebay Centre - 10:00am - 1:00pm
    PLC Building - 4:30pm to 7:00pm
    Read More
  • Family Law +

    Friday - Mar 3, 2017
    10:00 – 2 P.M.
    Cold Lake First Nation Council Chambers
    Read More
  • Landlord and Tenants ActFinding Good Legal Info +

    Thursday - Mar 30,2017
    10:00 – 12 P.M.
    Cold Lake FirstNation CouncilChambers
    Read More
  • Cold Lake First Nations BAND MEETING +

    March 27, 2017 - Location: Band Office – Chambers (Behind Reception) Read More
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  • Cold Lake First Nations Welcomes the Alberta Budget 2017

    March 21, 2017 (Cold Lake First Nation, Treaty No.6 Territory, Alberta)­ Cold Lake First Nations congratulates Premier Rachel Notley, her Cabinet, and the Government of Alberta for tabling the Alberta budget on March 16, 2017, that is compassionate to the needs of real Albertans in difficult economic circumstances, while putting forward a positive vision for the future relationship of the province of Alberta with First Nations in Alberta.
    Read More
  • Welcome

    Cold Lake First Nations is a Denesuline (Chipewyan) Tribe and part of the Dene Nation. Located 300 kilometers northeast of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, this dynamic First Nation has a total membership of over 2400 members. Approximately 1500 Band Members live in or near its three distinct neighbouring communities, namely "LeGoff"(Indian Reserve 149), "Cold Lake" (Indian Reserve 149 A) and "English Bay" (Indian Reserve 149 B) all of which are located in the scenic Cold Lake area.
  • Cold Lake First Nation pays tribute to former Premier Jim Prentice

    (October 2016) – Cold Lake First Nation Chief Bernice Martial paid tribute to cabinet minister and former Alberta Premier Jim Prentice while expressing her sadness on his tragic death. She stated: It is with sadness that we mark the sudden and untimely passing of Jim Prentice.
    Read More
  • Alex Janvier's mosaic, Tsa tsa ke k'e (Iron Foot Place), revealed at Rogers Place

    Nestled amid glowing advertising screens and a needful clinging to Edmonton’s halcyon-days hockey history, a magnificent work of true art has been summoned.
    Read More
  • Treaties 1-11 Chiefs Strategize to Implement Action Plan

    November 2, 2015, Traditional territory of Treaty No.7…Cold Lake First Nation’s (CLFN) Chief Bernice Martial and leadership attended the Treaties 1-11 Post Election Strategy meeting at the Grey Eagle Hotel at Tsuut’ina Nation.
    Read More
  • First Nations bear the risks of oilsands development

    Aboriginal communities fear environmental contamination and health problems related to oilsands mining, but say few people are listening to their concerns.
    Read More
  • Chief Martial Speaks on Experience at TRC Gathering

    Cold Lake First Nations Chief & Council invited mem-bers to attend the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) closing ceremonies in Ottawa. In attendance at the TRC event was: Chief Ber-nice Martial, Joyce Metch-ewais, Elise Charland, Frank Charland, Angie Grandbois, and Annabelle Martial.

    Read More
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Office Hours

  • Please be advised that effective immediately
    (Monday March 06,2017) our new office hours are from:

    Monday – Thursday8:30am – 4:30pm
    Friday  8:30am – 2:00pm

    Masi
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Employment Opportunities

  • 2016 07 Imperial Cold Lake Employment Opportunity Form +

    For any questions, comments on this document or to submit an opportunity please contact Imperial Cold Lake Socioeconomic Advisor Susan Scott This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 780-639-5194 Read More
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Chief Martial Speaks on Experience at TRC Gathering

Cold Lake First Nations Chief & Council invited mem-bers to attend the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) closing ceremonies in Ottawa. In attendance at the TRC event was: Chief Ber-nice Martial, Joyce Metch-ewais, Elise Charland, Frank Charland, Angie Grandbois, and Annabelle Martial. The reason the community members were invited to attend was that some attend-ed residential schools. The TRC event was an avenue to experience with other survi-vors, first hand the recom-mendations of their five-year mandate and to know what had happened historically. We need awareness on our past and heal from it to move forward. In 1962, my parents decided that they didn’t want us to go to residential school, as they knew that it wasn’t good for children, from sending to older sib-lings at first. My mom went to residential school and I definitely felt the intergener-ational affects of residential school. In 1986, my mother told me her story and how she was negatively impact-ed. It was very healing to share what had happened to her during those years. Through the intergenera-tional impacts and my own personal journey, I drank alcohol for 7 years to try and hide the pain and  decided at 25 years old I would sober up. I haven’t turned back since and glad to be so-ber to this day. This was beginning of my heal-ing journey. I went to Nechi Institute in 1985. I wrote about the negative impacts in my life and started talking about residential school and how it impacted me. Our Peoples are all on a healing journey and the TRC event gave me an opportunity to heal, I had tears of joy at the gathering. I be-lieve the hardest part emotionally was when they spoke of the genocide that happened at those horrible schools. It was very degrading and so much suffering occurred for many of the survivors and a lot of were abused physi-cally, spiritually, emotionally and sexually. It was very degrading and so much suffering oc-curred for many of the survivors and a lot of were abused physically, spiritually, emotionally and sex-ually. I could see why our Peoples drank and had addiction issues after attending these schools. It was a way of coping of what happened. We are now are slowly coming out of this and our future generations are much stronger. These children are why I lead the way I do and think we will be strong-er if we all start to live healthier lifestyles and unite as Denesuline Peoples.I learn to listen to our Peo-ples and have learned patience over the years. One  elder told me one time,  “you are what you speak.” 

Mahsicho,

Chief Bernice Martial